DPL is built upon the idea that only three types of relationship govern all relations between .NET classes, methods, properties, interfaces and members.

1. The container relationship.
Some .NET objects can contain other properties, methods or members. In DPL, we define a container relationship between a container A and a contained object B if, somewhere in the execution tree, it is possible that A contains B.

The DPL keyword for this type of relationship is CONTR (such as CONTAINER)

2. The Type relationship.
Some .NET objects can inherit from other types.

In case of .NET classes, the DPL type is the object base type; in case of methods or properties, the DPL is the type of the returned object.

The DPL keyword for this type of relationship is TYPE.

3. The call relationship.

A DPL object can call another DPL object. A method code or property code can call another method or property; it can also calls objects constructors. In DPL, the object constructor is also considered as a method contained in the class.

The DPL keyword for this type of relationship is CALLER

 

Last edited Jul 17, 2012 at 8:59 PM by kherty, version 1

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